PREVENTIVE (PROPHYLACTIC) MEASURES

Over 50% of women will suffer from cystitis at least once in their lifetime. Of these, 25% to 50% will suffer another infection within one year.1 If you are suffering from repeated bladder infections, preventive measures are available and might be a better option. Your physician will be able to provide more information on preventive options and advise if any would be suitable for you.


"For recurrent UTIs, there are different preventive strategies"

Professor Matteo Bassetti, Infectious Diseases

Immunostimulation

Immunostimulants work by priming your immune system to recognise and destroy infection-causing bacteria, for example E. Coli, when it encounters them, before cystitis symptoms can develop.2,3

Cranberries

There is some evidence that cranberry juice or capsules might prevent bacteria from sticking to the bladder wall and causing infection.2,4 Cranberry juice should be used with caution because some brands may have a high sugar content, presenting other health risks such as weight gain and even encouraging bacterial growth.5

Antibiotics

Continuous low dose antibiotics and taking a dose of antibiotics after sexual intercourse can be a successful preventive method. However, with the increasing problem of resistance, antibiotics are recommended to be used in prevention only when other options have failed.2,6

Oestrogen products (local application)

Post-menopausal women might be prescribed oestrogen products for local application, to attempt to restore the pre-menopausal vaginal environment (increase Lactobacilli) and reduce risk of infection.2,7

Probiotics

Probiotic products containing certain strains of Lactobacilli can be taken orally or inserted into the vagina to promote the growth of 'good' bacteria, which might reduce the risk of infection caused by 'bad' bacteria.2,8

Expert advice

"Prevention options for middle-aged women who are sexually active – they should take care of their sexual life. They should not have anal or oral sexual contact and they should take care of their sexual partners and post-menopausal females have the best possibility to prevent urinary tract infections by local substitution of oestrogens. This might be the best prevention possibility, but both groups could also prevent urinary tract infections by immunostimulating agents which could be taken orally or parenterally.

The most successful prevention possibility might be to have a stable sexual life and to take care of everything you eat and drink and perhaps to take agents that could stimulate the mucosal immunity and some agents which could prevent the adherence of the bacteria to the mucosa of the bladder and the urethra."

"The most successful prevention possibility might be to have a stable sexual life and to take care of everything you eat and drink and perhaps to take agents that could stimulate the mucosal immunity"

Professor Hartwig W. Bauer
Consultant Urologist